Prospect Rock Permaculture

Design and Education for Ecological Culture

Tag Archives: fruit trees

Fruit, Nut, Berry, Vine, and Medicinal Plant Sale- Preorder for May pickup

May 3- Plant Sale and Plum Flower Party!

Most plants are pre-ordered to be picked up.

Details will be announced soon, but we will have several varieties of

Hazelnuts

Hardy Kiwis

Sea Berry

Walnut

Apricot

Plums

Apples

Cherries

Pears

Grapes

Medicinal Herbs

Blueberries

Juneberries/ Saskatoons

Honeyberries

Currants/ Gooseberries

Strawberries

Asparagus

Rootstock for Apples, Pears, and Prunus (Plums, Peaches, Apricots, etc.)

And much more!

Read below for last year’s variety descriptions (most will still be available).

If you are looking for any plants in particular, please email Keith directly at Keith @ ProspectRock.org (no spaces).

Sorry- we are not set up to ship plants this spring!

We have a variety of plants for sale here from Willow Crossing Farm!

We hold one of the northeast’s most diverse collection of cold hardy fruits, nuts, berries, vines, medicinal herbs, nitrogen fixing and pollinator attracting plants.

Pre-ordered plants will be available for pick up at the farm May 3-4, and in Jeffersonville, Johnson, Burlington, or Stowe farmer’s markets in early May, dates TBA.

Our final availability for spring 2014 will be updated in March, please email if you’re looking for anything in particular, or would like to be notified directly when we have our list finalized.

Here’s some of what we’ll have available:

Bare Root “Northstar” Cherry.
A unique and tasty pie cherry from Minnesota. This self-fertile, naturally dwarf tree bears heavy crops of large, tasty, bright red fruit with red flesh and red juice. Northstar grows to 6-8 ft. in height and is hardy to minus 40°F. $25 1/2″ caliper trees.

Bare Root “Buartnut” Walnut/ Butternut cross2012-05-28 12.03.18 A cross of Butternut and Heartnut, this handsome, medium-size shade tree iproduces abundantcrops of tasty nuts. Buartnuts combine the hardiness and delicious flavor of Butternut with the high yields and easy to crack shell of the Heartnut. Trees are resistant to the Butternut fungalblight. $15 1′-2′ seedlings.

Bare Root “Cherry Red” Red Currant
A very pretty small shrub, Cherry Red bears heavy crops of beautiful, juicy, flavorful red berries. Great for fresh eating, Cherry Red Currants also make attractive and tasty jams and jellies. $12

Bare Root “Hinnomaki Red” Gooseberry
An attractive new variety from Finland and with abundant, dark red, sweet, large, and deliciousberries. Thorny. $10

Bare Root “Jostaberry” Currant / Gooseberry Cross
A unique cross of Gooseberry and Black Currant, Jostaberry is the most vigorous of all ourCurrant varieties. A very disease resistant and easy to grow small shrub, Jostaberry produces very large, jet black, sweet-tart fruit, high in Vitamin C and good for fresh eating and excellent for jams and jellies. Exceptionally large rooted bushes- $15

Potted Hardy Kiwis:
Anna“- One of the most popular varieties for gardeners and commercial growers alike, Anna’s attractive, very sweet and flavorful fruit can weigh up to 1/2 oz.
Tatyana“- This exceptionally hardy female variety bears abundant crops of tasty, sweet, large,lime-green fruit.

Natasha” (From Vladivostok, Russia, this exceptionally hardy variety bears abundant crops of sweet and delicious, large round fruit.)
$15 Each. Will require a male plant to fruit.

Potted Sea Berry “Botanica”
A Nitrogen Fixing Fruit bush! One of several superior varieties from a Soviet breeding program in Moscow, Botanica™ is prized for its abundant crops of very large and richly flavored, bright orange fruit. Botanica™ is a very reliable and productive variety. $15

Potted Flowering Currant “Mary’s Peak”
Brighten your landscape with the bright, reddish-orange floral display of this new form of Flowering Currant. Mary’s Peak™ produces profuse, striking, 3-4” long, fuchsia-like flower spikes. $15

Please note bare root trees are completely naked and not in pots- they will need to go right in the ground (and be watered) after picking them up.

Check out http://www.prospectrock.org for more details. We’ll be pulling out Grapes, Blueberries, Hazelnuts, Sugar Maples, Walnuts and much much more in the next few weeks.

In early May we’ll have a party at the farm and appreciate the incredible flower show with the Native American Plums, stop by if you want to see some of these plants available a bit more mature than the ones we sell.

Last year we had a record crop of plump, juicy, and unblemished organic Peaches- right here in the Lamoille River Valley of Northern Vermont!

Please share this with friends!

Best,
Keith

Willow Crossing Farm
http://www.WillowCrossing.org

Prospect Rock Permaculture
http://www.ProspectRock.org

Other Nursery Plants that may be available:

Local sales only.  Please call, email, or comment for prices and availability.

Sugar Maple     Acer saccharum

‘Sweet Sap’ Silver Maple     Acer saccharinum

Hardy Kiwi     Actinidia arguta

Arctic Kiwi     Actinidia kolomikta

Shagbark Hickory Carya ovata

Hardy Pecan Carya illinoensis

‘Hican’ (Pecan/ Hickory hybrid)     Carya

Black Walnut     Juglans nigra

Persian Walnut     Juglans regia

Butternut (White Walnut)     Juglans cinera

‘Buartnut’ (Butternut/ Heartnut hybrid)

Swamp White Oak  Quercus bicolor

‘Ashworth’ Burr Oak     Quercus macrocarpa

‘Hazelbert’ (Filbert/ Hazelnut hybrid)

American Chestnut     Castanea

Chestnut hybrids

 

 

 

Fruit Tree Grafting Workshop and 3rd Annual Scionwood Exchange- Sunday April 13

Image

Hi Friends,

Please share this with potentially interested friends and networks. Hope to see you!

Fruit Tree Grafting Workshop and 3nd Annual Scionwood Exchange

April 13, 10 am – 4 pm

Willow Crossing Farm
Johnson, VT

Join us for a day of hands-on fruit tree grafting. We’ll begin the day in the classroom understanding the science of grafting, and practice bench-grafting apples, pears, plums, and other stone fruits.

Everyone will have the opportunity to graft their own trees to take home!

After lunch, we’ll go out and tour grafted and ‘multi-grafted’ fruit trees (including peaches grafted onto plums) and ‘top work’ multiple varieties onto pears, apples, plums, and other stone fruit. We’ll discuss some pruning basics, different grafting strategies for ‘fruit salad trees’, healing damaged trees, reworking new varieties, revitalizing old orchards, enhancing cross-pollination, and space considerations. We’ll also look at and evaluate both successful and failed past grafts.

We’ll contextualize our work in briefly telling some history of our farm and touring our incredibly diverse collection of nuts, berries, vines, nitrogen-fixing plants, and regenerative DIY farm infrastructure. We’ll also explore the incredible history of grafting, the range of grafting possibilities, and practice with professional grafting tools which make for more successful grafts by novices and experts alike.

Each attendant will leave with an apple or pear variety of their choosing on semi-dwarf or standard rootstock, or a stone fruit variety of their choosing on native american plum rootstock.

$80 suggested donation sliding scale includes cider and tea, and your own grafted fruit trees to take home. No one will be refused for lack of funds, but everyone must pre-register.

Due to the popularity of this event, you much pre-register. There is a possibility of another event later in March or in April, please send an email to express your interest.
Please RSVP by filling out the registration form and submitting payment via paypal to: Keith@ProspectRock.org, or sending a check to:

‘Prospect Rock Permaculture’

P.O. Box 426

Jeffersonville, VT 05464

We must get your email address from you, as the weather will determine where we park cars. and we will also send you some information about how to best collect scion wood if you want to propagate some favorite fruit trees.

The workshop will be taught by:

Zach Leonard is a master horticulturalist and as been the farm manager of Elmore Roots Nursery for 15 years. He and his family have created High Hopes Farm, a diverse off-grid homestead.

Nicko Rubin is the owner of East Hill Tree Farm, where he has been growing and propagating hardy fruits and nuts in the foothills of the Groton Mountains. He completed the master’s program for sustainable landscape design at the Conway School.

Dave Johnson is a timber framer with a passion for fruit trees. His competence with sharp tools and wood translate readily into many successful grafts and a legacy of multi-grafted old wild apples throughout the hills of Vermont.

Keith Morris has been collecting and experimenting with rare fruits, nuts, and medicinal plants since 1996, and is professor of ecological design at the University of Vermont. He’s slowly built his family’s farm debt-free with sweat-equity and has contributed to creating resilient and diverse food systems on 5 continents.

Thank you,
Keith
(802) 734-1129

Willow Crossing Farm
Johnson, VT
http://www.WillowCrossing.org

Image

As a reminder- only a few spaces remain for our 7th Annual Prospect Rock Permaculture Design Certification Course, July 20 – August 1, 2014.

Our Fruit, Nut, Berry, Vine, and Medicinal Plant Sale will be Saturday, May 3- Please pre-order to ensure you can get the plants you want!

Orchard Pruning Workshop- March 2

ImageHands on- Fruit and Nut Tree Pruning

A day long exploration of the science and practice of ecological tree crop management for diverse yields.

Willow Crossing Farm

Johnson, VT

SUNDAY, MARCH 2

10 am – 4 pm

Join VT’s Master Horticulturalist Zach Leonard and Tree Farmer Keith Morris for a day of hands-on practice with fruit and nut tree pruning, in a diverse permaculture forest garden setting.

Spend the morning in the large yurt learning the science and ecology of how trees lose limbs and ‘heal’, and explore the deep traditions of how humans beings observe and interact with this phenomenon.   We’ll synthesize a variety of pruning ideas, strategies, and techniques to help you develop your own philosophy, understanding, and confidence to go out and work with trees in your landscape in a regenerative and yielding way.

After lunch and some hot cider we’ll go outside to explore one of VT’s oldest permaculture designed food forests- a reforestation of old pasture and hayfield in the floodplain of the Lamoille River.  We’ll briefly tour ‘Productive Buffers’, wildlife corridors, and stop to work in zones of Plums, Apples, Peaches, Pears, Berries, Vines, Hazelnuts, Walnuts, and more- driven by the group’s interest, and discussing pruning techniques for trees both young and old.

We’ll look at and evaluate previous years of pruning decisions and ensuing consequences, and explore some natural tree injuries and healing responses, helping participants to better understand the implications of our pruning decisions over varying periods of time.

We’ll finish the day practicing with different tools to cut wood cleanly- with an eye towards maximizing production, fruit quality, ease of future maintenance, and minimizing pest and disease pressure.  We’ll also set the stage for top-working, multi-variety grafting, species changes (i.e.. Peaches on Plum roots), and other forms of propagation.  In preparation for our March 16 Grafting Workshop and Scionwood Exchange

We’ll also prune mature, bearing Hazelnuts and manage black locust, walnut, butternut/ buartnut, pecans, and more for nuts, firewood, high-value lumber, succession, aesthetics, and other long-term aims.

We’ll pass around, demonstrate, and allow you to trial favorite tools, including pruners, saws, pole saws, etc.; speak to their selection and maintenance, and discuss hygienic practices to promote orchard health and reduce cross-contamination.

This workshop kicks off our series for 2014!  

Please enter your email in the box on the right hand side of the page, or ‘like’ us on Facebook to get the calendar and details for our other offerings such as:  fruit tree grafting (March 16), nursery plant sale, natural beekeeping workshop, nut production, diverse understory planting, spring development for gravity fed irrigation, natural building, compost heat, season extension, earth oven construction, stone masonry, and more.

Our Plum Flower Festival and Nursery Plant Sale is scheduled for May 4, with some plants available for pickup Saturday May 3, or delivery into Burlington.

Our 2014 Permaculture Design Certification Course will be held July 20- August 1, and is filling quickly.  Applications for our Advanced Permaculture Design / Build /Grow / Teach internship, and APDC guided portfolio development will now be accepted on a rolling basis!

Event is $60 suggested donation/ sliding scale, including warm or cold cider during lunch and a round of hard cider tasting (21 and over) afterwards.  No one will be refused for lack of funds.

*We are looking for photographers or videographers to help document the event, or create a short educational video.*

Please pre-register, and dress to spend the day outdoors.

We’ll need your email address if you’re planning on coming because the weather will determine where we’ll have people park.  Feel free to bring your *clean, sterile, and sharp* pruners and saws.

Image

Zach Leonard is a master horticulturalist and was farm manager of Elmore Roots Nursery for over a decade.  He and his family have created High Hopes Farm, a diverse, off-grid homestead, where they preserve heirloom apples, sheep, and more.  He runs High Hopes Tree Care, Vermont’s most experienced orchard restoration and maintenance service specializing in Organic Management.

Image

Keith Morris has been collecting and experimenting with rare fruit and nut trees for 14 years, and is professor of ecological design at the University of Vermont.  He has worked to help create resilient, diverse, socially just, and economically viable food systems around the world since 1996.

Please spread the word to potentially interested friends and networks.

Thank you for your support of our work!

Thanks,
Keith and Crew
Willow Crossing Farm
www.willowcrossing.org

ImageImageImage

Productive Riparian Buffers and Tree Crops Tour

The female flowers of a ‘Buartnut’, which have been hand pollinated by Butternut- giving us Vermont’s first ‘ButterBuarts’!

Hi Friends and Colleagues,

Here is a last minute invitation to any of you who may be interested in joining a small group of students, researchers, and folks with NOFA and UVM Extension for an informal tour of the ‘productive buffers’ and Tree Crops collection at Willow Crossing Farm in Johnson, VT.

As our rivers, riverside farms, and riverside towns are increasingly put to the test with erratic weather we look forward to contributing to the conversation about the health of our rivers and agricultural economy with over a decade of experience testing 100s of species of plants suitable for ‘productive buffers’ and productive floodplain reforestation.  This event is to prelude a larger event this fall, and a multi-day ‘Tree Crops Symposium’ scheduled for the late spring of 2013 with some of the world’s foremost experts in tree crops, nut production, agroforestry, and non-timber forest products.

Willow Crossing Farm (Prospect Rock Permaculture) has been dedicated to making floodplain reforestation profitable and ecologically regenerative since 2001.  Through combinations of native riparian plants with both native and rare nut, fruit, sugar, timber, and firewood producing trees, berries and medicinal herbs, we’ve worked to reforest our river’s corridors and flood prone sections of our farm aiming to prevent erosion; conserve soil and nutrients; shade waterways and improve water quality; create fish, wildlife, and pollinator habitat; and offset atmospheric carbon- all while adding to our long-term bottom line.

We grow many different varieties of plums, apples, cherries, pears, apricots, peaches, berries, paw paws, and over 17 species of nut trees.

Last summer, our systems were put to the test with two 500 year floods within 4 months and largely performed as designed- catching and diverting flotsam and protecting cultivated areas, greenhouses, and other farm infrastructure.  Now, we are inviting other farmers, and anyone interested in watershed health and the potential for ecologically regenerative and carbon-negative farming systems to take inspiration from our trials, and share in our mistakes, successes, and other information gained.

Please be in touch with Keith Morris (Keith@ProspectRock.org or (802) 734-1129) if you are interested in attending.

Please feel free to share with students or other potentially interested contacts or networks.

Best,
Keith

Permaculture for the Northcountry: Adirondacks

Open Consultation, Participatory Design Charrettes, and Lecture Series

Turtle Hill Community and St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY

August 9 – 11

Tuesday August 9

Turtle Hill

9:00-12:00   2-Part Open Lecture: 

Permaculture is an evolving and expanding design system used to create agriculturally productive human habitat at scales varying from balconies to broader regions.  Spend the morning with professional ecological designer Keith Morris exploring this design science used by individuals and communities to create ethical, socially just, and ecologically regenerative perennial support systems during an ‘Open Consultation’ for the Turtle Hill and St. Lawrence University Communities.

The History of Permaculture and ‘Participatory Ecology’

As permaculture rapidly expands around the world, the field is constantly evolving and taking new directions.  We’ll discuss the history of permaculture and ecological design as we look to the sciences of ecology, anthropology, and evolution for inspiration and guidance to establish our homes, gardens, and communities as ‘human ecosystems’ that are less fuel reliant, beautiful, productive, ecologically regenerative, and more wholly nourishing.  

What is the potential for human beings as ‘Keystone Species’?  How have we acted as such in the past?  We’ll explore the ways human beings have ‘co-created’ ecological communities in the past, at present, and our potential to do so more insightfully in the future, with a particular eye to the unique challenges and opportunities of the Adirondacks and Northcountry region.

Designing an Ecological Energy Descent Culture

As we acknowledge the convergent crises of the 21st century, we can be overwhelmed with visions of apocalypse- or embrace some of the greatest opportunities to restructure society with ecological and ethical sanity, localized resilience, and abundance.  We explore the relationships between the built environment, food security, energy, water, and natural communities, in order to retrofit this infrastructure to better adapt to a changing and potentially challenging future.  By examining today’s multifaceted problems from a systems perspective, we focus on the intersection of social and ecological health, and find the best opportunities for leverage to affect change in our personal lives and communities.  

Introduction to Turtle Hill Community and Site 

Lunch

Turtle Hill Orientation and Site Walk

Observation of Nature/Natural Patterns

SLU

4:30 Introduction to SLU Community and Site

5:00 Dinner

7:00-8:00 Public Lecture: 

Breeding with Climate Change: New Plants for the North:

While no one’s celebrating ‘Global Weirding’, a changing climate does offer some new opportunities for growers in the cold northcountry.  As important as political and personal efforts are to stem the causes of climate change, it may be even more important that we anticipate and prepare for different future scenarios.  We will look at the ‘movement’ of ecosystems in nature, and explore ways we can harness this fact to our benefit, and mimic natural adaptation by selecting for delayed flowering and earlier ripening with promising marginal species and varieties.  In particular, we’ll look at some ‘new’ fruits, nuts, vines, and grains presently being bred for ‘northward migration’, and will discuss more general strategies for resilient food systems amidst the many uncertainties of the future.

Wednesday August 10

Turtle Hill

9:00-12:00 2-Part Open Lecture: 

Season Extention/ Greenhouse Integration: (Winter Vegetables- even for the far north!)

Greenhouses are an essential component of diversified and season-extended growing in the northcountry, and also a great addition to a low energy and resilient household.  Learn how greenhouses can be integrated with homes, animal shelters, barns, and other structures to reduce energy needs, supplement heating and fresh food in the winter, and even- if well designed- help cool buildings in summer months.  We’ll introduce the basics of passive solar design, thermal mass, ventilation, subterranean heat storage, orientation, and glazing options, as well as meet some of the unique plants greenhouses allow us to grow.  We’ll also look at ‘Quick Hoops’, ‘Rolling Greenhouses’, and other strategies for unheated year round vegetable production, see some photos, (and share some secrets) from some of Vermont’s most established winter vegetable production farms.  This spring, presenter Keith Morris received a grant to build Vermont’s first winter-production greenhouse on wheels at Willow Crossing Farm.  

Designing your Design Process

Here we’ll get into the ‘brass tacks’ of ecological design.  We’ll discuss goals articulation, base mapping, analysis and assessment (ie. ‘reading the landscape’),  data overlay through the ‘Scale of Permanence’, and other planning and design strategies.  This is in preparation for an afternoon of map-making, graphical analysis, and walking the land with an eye towards refining and communicating our visoins of more resilient food production, processing and storage; on-site waste management and cycling; decentralized energy production; as well as a beautiful and functional landscape that brings neighbors together in abundance and enhances the broader social and ecological communities that provide our context.

Lunch

Participatory Design Workshop: Analysis and Assessment/Group map-making, etc.

Dinner 

Group Design Session

Thursday August 11 

Turtle Hill

Open Lecture: Invisible Structures – Economic, Decision-Making, etc. 

Design Concepts

Phase Planning

Lunch

SLU

2:00 Meeting with SLU grounds staff and SLU design wrap-up

Bio:

Keith Morris has been applying his lifelong love of nature and culture and experience as an activist to permaculture and ecological design since 1996. He has worked professionally as a designer, builder, and grower of ecologically regenerative, socially just, and culturally appropriate whole-systems in cities and countrysides around the world since 2000.  He is the founder of Prospect Rock Permaculture (www.prospectrock.org), Willow Crossing Farm, co-founder of the Permaculture Institute of the NorthEast (P.I.N.E.), and teaches ecological design at the University of Vermont, the Yestermorrow Design Build School, Sterling College, Paul Smiths College, Burlington Permaculture, and with other community organizations.  While his expertise is ecological regeneration, high-performance food production, and shelter systems for cold temperate/ arctic conditions, he works regularly in New York City and has designed and implemented systems in New Zealand, Colorado, Chile, Argentina, California, New Mexico, Arizona, Nigeria, Ghana, Denmark, and the Netherlands.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 684 other followers